Project #2: Pressure Sensor Switch Cat Helmet

Blog Posts Fall 2019

For the second project, I used paper mache techniques and a balloon to make a makeshift cat helmet that triggers an LED light on and off when pressure is applied. I used code and tutorial that was based around the original Arduino pressure sensor tutorial, modified on Makerguides and written by Benne de Bakker.

Materials: 1:1 ratio of wood glue and water, newspaper, cardboard, black duct tape, Arduino, breadboard, green LED, 100K resistor, pressure sensor, hookup wires, electrical tape

The helmet and a very chaotic room/workspace
Set up on the breadboard

I inflated a balloon until it matched the size of my sister’s head and soaked strips of newspaper in a one to one wood glue and water mixture. I then wrapped each piece around the balloon and waited a day for the cast to dry. Afterwards, I popped the balloon and cut the mold in half so it formed the shape of a helmet. The green LED (long leg) was connected to power through the resistor shown, while the shorter leg was connected to pin 2 on the Arduino. One leg of the sensor was connected to power, while the other to A0 on the Arduino. Power was connected via hookup wire to 5V, and GND to…GND.

LED being triggered and turned off

Github code: https://github.com/svalde6/hello-world/blob/master/Cat%20LED%20Switch%20Helmet

Link to code source: https://www.makerguides.com/fsr-arduino-tutorial/

Final Assignment

Blog Posts Fall 2019

List of  material and parts:

  • Cardboard and cutter.
  • Arduino UNO R3 board.
  • Two stipper motores and three wheels.
  • Ultrasonic sensor.
  • On/off switch (optional).
  • Small breadboard. Jumping wires, and 9V battery.

How the circuit constructed:

  • Connecting the 1 stepper motor:
    • Wire In 1-4 to pin digital 3-6 on the UNO R3 board.
    • Wire the 5v on the stepper motor to ground from the UNO R3 board.
    • Wire the 12v on the stepper motor to 5v from the UNO R3 board.
  • Connecting the 2 stepper motor:
    • Wire In 1-4 to pin digital 7-10 on the UNO R3 board.
    • Wire the 5v on the stepper motor to ground from the UNO R3 board.
    • Wire the 12v on the stepper motor to 5v from the UNO R3 board.
  • Connecting the ultrasonic sensor:
    • Wire Echo to digital 12 on the UNO R3 board.
    • Wire Trig to digital 13 on the UNO R3 board.
    • Wire Vcc to 5v from  UNO R3 board.
    • Wire ground to ground from  UNO R3 board.
  • Connecting the on/off switch:
    • Sadder the 5v from the battery in the middle pin on the switch.
    • Sader the ground from the battery in either of the two pins around the middle one, you just saddered the 5v on.

Cutting and constructing with cardboard:

  • Cut 2 pieces of 3.5*4.0 inches.
  • Cut 2 pieces of 5.5*3.5 inches.
  • Cut 2 pieces of 4.0*5.5 inches.

Helicopter Runway

Blog Posts Fall 2019

Materials Used:

  • NeoPixel Light Strip
  • Servo motor
  • PIR Sensor
  • Arduino Board
  • Alligator Clips
  • Wire
  • Small breadboard
  • A box (painted with acrylic paint)
  • box cutter

Step 1: Set up the arduino board. Start off with the PIR sensor. Attach ground to ground, then attach the OUT pin on the PIR to pin 2 on the arduino board, and then attatch 5V to the 5V pin on the arduino board. To attach the 5V pin, use a bread board because the servo and the neopixels will also be attached to 5V. To do this, take a wire and attach it to the 5V pin on the arduino board, and attach the other end of that wire to the breadboard. On that same “line” (so right behind or in front of this pin on the breadboard), attach the 5V from the PIR. Then attach the servo. Do this by attaching ground to ground (the brown wire on the servo), attach red wire to the 5V on the breadboard, then attach the orange wire to pin 9. For the neopixels, again, attach ground to ground, then attach the power to 5V , and the third one should be placed in pin 6.

Some arduino pins are shared, so the breadboard is necessary.
All wires should be lined up like this, depending on if they’re attached to ground or 5V.
Here is a Close up of the Arduino board.

Step 2: Confirm that the circuit is working by attaching to computer and uploading code. The code link can be found at the very end of this document.

Step 3: Paint the box to make it appear like a runway.

Brush on the pavement and use a sponge brush to apply the grass.
Add some lines and finished!

Step 4: To embed the circuit, maka a slit where the pavement is. Make it large enough so the neopixels can fit and small enough where the slash isn’t very visible. Cut out a square for the PIR sensor and a rectangle for the servo. Glue these to the top of the box using a hot glue gun.

Step 5: Enjoy!

Code Link: https://github.com/tmunoz2/Helicopter-Runway-2

Video Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CiS5-M8wIeo

Final Project

Blog Posts Fall 2019

what it is: The anti comfort bear. I designed this to be a comfort bear at first with the lights and two sensors acting as warning signs for when the comfort animal gets to warm or receives to much pressure. This action was to allow there to be a connection and communication between the person and the stuffed animal which there is. However it turned into a somewhat anti comfort animal because of all the warnings and difficulty finding a happy medium. Overall though this project was to establish a connection and communication between this comfort animal that people can use for comfort, to handle steers or other reasons. To showcase how the stuffed animal feels or is effected by the person using it. How the person and the stuffed animal can work together to create a happy medium for both.

code: https://github.com/gsimental/Final-Project.git

Part list

  • 10k resistor
  • Round Force-Sensitive Resistor(FSR)
  • Temperature Sensor
  • female cables (i think, check)(for temp)(4)
  • 2 red wires
  • 3 black wires
  • 2 white wires
  • neopixel strip
  • adapter
  • 9v battery
  • needle
  • tread (which ever color you need. I used….)
  • marker
  • scissors
  • stuffing
  • fabric
  • bread board
  • arduino UNO R3
Some of the materials used
Some of the materials used

For the temperature sensor

Step 1)Take the header strip and cut the strip to the length needed. Then place it onto a breadboard with the long pins facing down to make it easier to solder it to the temperature senor.

adafruit_products_header.jpg
Photo credit to: https://learn.adafruit.com/adafruit-mcp9808-precision-i2c-temperature-sensor-guide/arduino-code

Step 2) Place the temperature sensor over the pins so that the short pins go through the temperature sensors .

photo credit to: https://learn.adafruit.com/adafruit-mcp9808-precision-i2c-temperature-sensor-guide/arduino-code

Step 3) Then solder all the pins

Photo credit to:https://learn.adafruit.com/adafruit-mcp9808-precision-i2c-temperature-sensor-guide/arduino-code
  • Step 4) Connect this to the UNO Arduino board by using the 4 Female to Male Jumper Wires
  • Step 5) Connect Vdd to the power supply to 5V
  • Connect GND to common power/data ground
  • Connect the SCL pin to A5
  • Connect the SDA pin to A4

For the Neopixel Lights

Step 1) Pick 3 different color wires. Cut them to the length needed and strip both ends of the wires

Step 2) Take one end of each of the wires to solder to the labels on the neopixels labeled 5V, Din, and GND

Combine both the Temperature Sensor and the Force-Sensitive Resistor to the neopixel strip lights

Before hand cut 4 wires (3 out of the 4 being different colors and 2 being the same color) and strip both ends of them

step 1) Put the force-sensitive resistor in the breadboard

step 2) Then put a 10k resistor into the breadboard with the one leg in-front of the leg of the force sensor and the other leg in the ground (negative) strip of the breadboard

step 3) Take a wire (I used a black wire) and put it into a spot on the breadboard in-front of the other leg of the force sensor. Then take the other end of the wire and connect it to power(positive) strip of the breadboard.

Step 4)Put a wire (I used a white wire) in a spot in-front of the 10k resistor and place the other end of the wire into A0 on the arduino UNO R3.

Step 5) Take another wire(I used a black wire) and connect it to ground on the breadboard and then connect the other end to the ground spot on the arduino UNO R3.

Step 6) Take another wire (I used a red wire) to put it into the power spot on the breadboard and then connect the other end of the wire to 5V power spot on the arduino UNO R3.

for steps 4-6

Step 7) Then take the three wires connected to the neopixel lights and connect the wire that is soldered to the GND label(I used a black wire) to the ground spot on the arduino UNO R3. Then take the wire that is soldered to the Din (I used a red wire) and connect it to pin 6 on the arduino UNO R3. Lastly take the wire that is soldered to the 5V and connect it to the power (positive) spot on the breadboard.

Note: Since I put the instustions on how to set up and connect the tempature sensor to the arduino UNO R3 above I decide not to repeat it. However once everything is connected the coding process can develop more.

Step 8) Download Adafruit MCP9808 Library and the Adafruit NeoPixel library

Step 9) Check to make sure the Adafruit_MCP9880 folder has Adafruit_MCP9808.cpp and Adafruit_MCP9808.h. Also make sure the Adafruit NeoPixel folder has examples and has the strandtest to use to set up the code.

Step 10) Open up the example in the folder labeled mcp9880test (this is to code)and upload to your Arduino wired up to the sensor. Open up the serial terminal window at 9600 speed to see the temperature in the room. And can test to see what makes the temperature change.

Step 11) Code based off the reading you get for temperature.

Setp 12) Open up the example in the NeoPixel library labeled strandtest and upload it to the arduino UNO R3. Using the force senor connect to the board and neopixel strip light open up the serial terminal window at 9600 speed to see the pressure readings and code based on the amount of pressure you want use.

Note: that in order to see the pressure readings the temperature sensor has to be taken out and when placed back in the only readings will be the temperature sensor.

Step 13) Combine both the temperature sensor code and the neopixel code. Add in the pressure (force sensor) in the code as well.

Once the code and the setup work well togther create a stuffed animal to put everything in.

For the Stuffed Animal

step 1) Choose fabric for your stuffed animals. I chose a galaxy fabric

step 2) Pick an animal. I chose a bear.

step 3) Make a pattern of the bear. basically make an outline of what the bear should look like. I looked up online about how to draw a cartoon bear and printed out the pieces of the bear to outline on the fabric. Also pick out the size of the bear. I based the size off of the wires, breadboard and the arduino UNO R3 that I would have to go inside the stuffed animal.

Step 4) Trace the different body parts needed to create the bear onto the fabric twice and then cut them out.

step 5) Sew the pieces of fabric that was cut out. Leave a little part of the pieces open.

Step 6) put stuffing into the open parts of the sewed pieces of the bear and then once its stuffed enough sew the pieces shut.

Step 7) Sew all of the body parts together to create the bear.

Overall final step) Open up the stomach of the bear to put the wires, breadboard and arduino UNO R3 into it. Also cut out a spot for the temperature sensor and cut a spot for the force sensor. Also cut out spots for the neopixel lights. Once everything is inside the bear close it back up.

Final Result)

video of final result: https://photos.app.goo.gl/RsP5zcSugyrvvfez7

another video of final result: https://photos.app.goo.gl/qxpi4ZdiR2D6wZ5z5